Climate change: US Republicans alarm China over talks

Chinese leader Xi Jinping and US President Barack Obama agreed to help China stop her greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 in order to combat climate change and global warming, but Republicans in the US Senate rose up against Obama’s pledge toward China quitting gas emissions at the said date.
And so in view of talks coming up in Lima, Peru next week, Chinese climate change negotiators are afraid that the US Republicans attitude could disrupt the purpose of the deal.

Xie Zhenhua, vice director of the national planning agency and the chief negotiator on climate change said that “Because of internal politics in the US the Kyoto protocol was not ratified, so we are worried that we might face the same problem in the 2015 pact.” The Lima meeting is supposed to pave a way for another meeting in Paris next year where international climate agreements will be sealed.

And Frederic Mion, who is helping organise the Paris summit states that “There is a feeling that the announcement by Xi Jinping and Mr Obama changed the picture, The Chinese are now much more willing, less obstructive than we could have believed six months ago.”

Meanwhile, since the Chinese appear to be targeting 2030 to cut carbon emissions, Mr. Xie is of the view that “In 16 years there is lot of uncertainty, and trying to pin down a very accurate time or number down to two decimal places is actually not scientific.”

The Chinese government appears careful not to ally themselves with any global climate accord for now, most especially since the former premier Wen Jiabao’s negotiations of 2009 in Copenhagen was regarded as undermining Chinese diplomacy. He couldn’t commit on behalf of a Chinese political system that was torn by strong interest groups.